Last edited by Yolmaran
Saturday, May 2, 2020 | History

5 edition of Locating and Evaluating Information on the Internet found in the catalog.

Locating and Evaluating Information on the Internet

Art Wolinsky

Locating and Evaluating Information on the Internet

  • 120 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by Rebound by Sagebrush .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • General,
  • Juvenile Fiction,
  • Children"s 9-12,
  • Children"s Books/Ages 9-12 Fiction,
  • Computer network resources,
  • Evaluation,
  • Internet searching,
  • Juvenile literature,
  • World Wide Web,
  • Children: Grades 4-6

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9656397M
    ISBN 100613861698
    ISBN 109780613861694


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Locating and Evaluating Information on the Internet by Art Wolinsky Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Locating and evaluating information on the Internet. [Art Wolinsky] -- Provides an overview of the Internet and discusses how to find information on it and evaluate the quality Locating and Evaluating Information on the Internet book that information, with an emphasis on the World Wide Web.

Information is an overview of how to find and evaluate material on the World Wide Web. The author describes a wide range of tools available to searchers; gives students tips to make their searches more successful; and cautions them to filter out illegal, porn, hate, and inaccurate sites. Parts of this book Author: Art Wolinsky.

Evaluating information encourages you to think critically about the reliability, validity, accuracy, authority, timeliness, point of view or bias of information sources.

Just because a book, article, or website matches your search criteria and thus seems, at face value, to be relevant to your research, does not mean that it is necessarily a. For the final project you will be completing an Annotated Bibliography. An an n otated bibliography is the full APA Reference of a source followed by notes and commentary about a so urce.T he word “annotate” means “critical or explanatory notes” and the word “bibliography” means “a list of sources”.

Annotation s are meant to be critical in addition to being : Suzanne Schriefer. As a general rule, use books when you need an in-depth, comprehensive treatment of a subject, historical event, or person.

OneSearch is the primary tool for identifying and locating books. The majority of non-fiction books owned by the library are scholarly, Author: Susan Steele. Locating and evaluating information on the Internet by Art Wolinsky,Enslow Publishers edition, in EnglishPages: Locating and evaluating information on the Internet Locating and evaluating information on the Internet by Wolinsky, Art.

Publication date Topics Computer network resources, Internet searching, World Wide Web, Internet Publisher Internet Archive Books. Scanned in : A book published in will not be as current as most websites, although it may provide good background information. Internet resources like are generally more current than books; a website should Locating and Evaluating Information on the Internet book the date it was last updated.

Try the Internet using a search engine, such as Google. Note: be careful and check your results; Most trustworthy website domain sites are commercial, they want to sell are often nonprofit, but often have ads (Source: IFLA-How To Spot Fake News) Checking Health Information from books, magazines, TV news or online.

Evaluating the information that you find. So you have found a site or document that seems to be useful. How reliable is that information likely to be.

Just because it's on the 'net does not mean it's correct or reliable. Unfortunately, some of the information on the Web is inaccurate, biased, out-of-date, shallow, and inappropriate for academic.

Information Literacy Standard Two: “The student who is information literate evaluates information critically and competently” (AASL and AECT14). However, evaluation is an immensely difficult and complicated process.

Research shows that evaluating information is a complex task usually performed within the context of an even more. Turn to 31j for detailed guidelines for evaluating sources.

31b What is a search strategy. A search strategyis an organized procedure for locating and assembling information for your research. You find this information in two places: on the Internet and in the library.

Developing a File Size: KB. A book published in will not be as current as most Web sites, although it may provide good background information. Internet resources like are generally more current than books; a Web site should indicate the date it was last updated.

As the Internet evolves and becomes more sophisticated, our strategies for finding and evaluating information need to evolve as well. The stories in this book range from investigating challenging research questions to exploring health issues and everyday life questions like finding a /5(4).

This book introduces third through sixth grade teachers to problem-based learning (PBL), a system for classroom instruction and curriculum development.

It combines the PBL system with practice in locating, evaluating, and thinking about information from the Internet. It provides 8 PBL units for use in the classroom, offering instructions for completing each unit in 14 class by: 4.

Evaluating Information. Effective users of information need to develop skills to evaluate materials. In the academic setting evaluating information could include: selecting an appropriate source for an assignment (book, article, newspaper, etc.) identifying a credible website; determining the authority of an author or publisherAuthor: Julie Gilmore.

Knowing how to conduct deeper research efficiently and effectively is a critical skill for journalists — especially in the information age. It is, like other facets of the profession such as interviewing, a matter of practice and establishing good habits.

And once you find a successful routine for information-gathering, it will pay dividends. Internet search. We often set up a class meeting with a librarian to help students find appropriate search terms and academic journals for their topics. We also emphasize that researchers need to allocate a large amount of time for searching, locating, and evaluating materials.

Finally, we File Size: KB. evaluate a given book or journal article and can explain inherent biases or limitations (e.g. look at author or organizational source of information, date material was published, etc) differentiate between primary and secondary sources; know when it is appropriate to use internet sites for research; evaluate information retrieved on the Internet.

Evaluating Information Sources Is this book or article or website any good. Every source of information—books, magazine articles, the Internet, broadcast news programs, talk radio shows, encyclopedias, and government publications—incorporates the perspective or bias of its author(s).

Locating and Evaluating Materials Research Strategies. Such information might include a chapter in a book, an article in a journal, a report, or a government document. Databases are a researcher’s best friend, but it can take a little time to get used to searching for sources in your library’s databases.

Internet Searching. Web. Thinking critically, analysing and evaluating the information that you find during your research is an important part of this. Thinking critically Critical thinking is a process used to think about and evaluate information and reach a conclusion.

Information can come from virtually anywhere — media, blogs, personal experiences, books, journal and magazine articles, expert opinions, encyclopedias, and web pages — and the type of information you need will change depending on the question you are trying to.

Information is everywhere on the Internet, existing in large quantities and continuously being created and revised. This information exists in a large variety of kinds (facts, opinions, stories, interpretations, statistics) and is created for many purposes (to inform, to persuade, to sell, to present a viewpoint, and to create or change an attitude or belief).

You may also find internet resources useful for your paper, but you will need to be extra careful in evaluating these resources. This guide is available within the Millstein Library site. You can copy and paste the information into a Word document, or print it Author: Kelly Safin.

All research assignments require the most current information possible. Internet resources are generally more current than books. A website should indicate the date it was last updated. Reading a book that's out of date can still add to your understanding of a subject.

Evaluating information usually consists of weighing a number of criteria together, so you will need to assess how important authorship is on a case-by-case basis. If no information on the author can be found, or there is no signature or attribution on the page itself, go directly to.

skills for locating, evaluating, and recording information. The recent news that Google intends to scan the contents of several research libraries into its database should serve to remind us that not everything is available on the Internet.

But good researchers still need to be able to find information from a variety of sources. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Library One Washington Square | San José, CA | | San José, CA | Author: Ann Agee. LOCATING SOURCES OF INFORMATION To be successful at CQUniversity study, you will need to become ‘information literate’. This means mastering a set of six key skills that will make finding and using the right information for assessment tasks more efficient and more effective.

These six skills are:» identifying the type of information neededFile Size: 57KB. Conduct an Internet search for information about a health-related topic using one of the Web site URLs listed in the chapter Critique the validity of the information obtained from searching a site on the Internet.

Evaluating Digital Sources. Because so much information is now available online, it’s important to know how to navigate digital sources versus print sources. Today, almost every print source has a digital edition (e.g., ebooks, online newspapers), and some academic journals only publish digitally.

Evaluating information found in a library database: Many sources which were previously available only in print format are now also available electronically.

In some cases, the print version has been discontinued and completely replaced by an online version. This is particularly true of databases (indexes) for locating journal articles.

The Internet and the library both contain information on virtually any topic, but it’s important to make sure that you use credible, current sources.

Inaccurate, questionable, or out-of-date sources can undermine your ideas and cause the reader to question your authority on your topic. Relevant and informed sources can help you to support and.

Evaluating Your Broadband Speed. By J. Biersdorfer. Feb. 8, ; like in peak Internet use hours during the workday, or in the evenings. Using the Internet for Active Teaching and Learning combines both theory and practice to introduce the Internet's potential as a Home.

WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search the book is organized according to the Internet's function in the classroom-from communication to locating and evaluating information, publishing Read. Evaluating Internet Information (Virginia Tech) Answering the following questions about a book, article or webpage can help you decide if the source is Author: Cathy Burwell.

Because of the hodge-podge of information on the Internet, it is very important you develop evaluation skills to assist you in identifying quality Web pages. There are six (6) criteria that should be applied when evaluating any Web site: authority, accuracy, objectivity, currency, coverage, and appearance.

For each criterion, there are several. Book - Print. For print books, bibliographic information can be found on the TITLE PAGE. This page has the complete title of the book, author(s) and publication information.

The publisher information will vary according to the publisher - sometimes this page will include the name of the publisher, the place of publication and the : María Bonet. • background information • bibliographies of additional sources. A book doesn't need to be read cover-to-cover to be used for research.

To determine how appropriate and useful the book might be, look at its parts as outlined in the box below. All sources of information need to be evaluated before they are used in a research project.

Primary resources contain first-hand information, meaning that you are reading the author’s own account on a specific topic or event that s/he participated in.

Examples of primary resources include scholarly research articles, books, and diaries.Reliable Information is Power You may have heard that "knowledge is power," or that information, the raw material of knowledge, is power. But the truth is that only some information is power: reliable information.

Information serves as the basis for beliefs, decisions, choices, and understanding our world. If we make a decision based onFile Size: KB. Locating Books. For print books, you need more information to find the book. Click each plus sign below to see what you need to know.

Author: Ann Agee.